Posts tagged artist
Isaac Mizrahi | Sui Generis
 

A tribute to the visionary American fashion designer, performer and entrepreneur Isaac Mizrahi, who is releasing his new book I.M.: A Memoir today – and for whom I am very fortunate to have worked for. Featuring some of his most iconic designs – often uniting opposites: evening and sportswear; formal and casual; couture and mass market – with his unique position at the intersection of high style and popular culture.

Kitchen Sink Pink Dress, Fall 2006 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Sketch for Kitchen Sink Pink Dress, Fall 2006

The mixed use of natural and synthetic, high-end and mass-market fabrics is a striking feature of Isaac’s work. Kitchen Sink Pink is a cascade of shades in a rosy palette, inspired by the pink neon sculptures of Dan Flavin.

Exploded Tulip, Spring 1992 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Exploded Tulip, Spring 1992

Printed silk crepe dress with one of Isaac Mizrahi’s iconic exploded floral motifs.

 
 
Sketch for Everyflower Dress, Fall 2007 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Sketch for Everyflower Dress, Fall 2007

Isaac Mizrahi Quote
Elevator Pad Gown, Spring 2005 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Elevator Pad Gown, Spring 2005

 
 
Elevator Pad Gown, Spring 2005 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Elevator Pad Gown, Spring 2005

Workhorse elevator padding used by movers inspired Mizrahi. He appropriated the quilting technique, but elevated the shipping blanket in a patchwork of blue, green, gray and silver silk. The bodice was shaped from grosgrain ribbons, using heat molding.

 
 
Extreme Kilt | Stewart plaid cashmere flannel gown, Fall 1989 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Sketch For Extreme Kilt, Fall 1989

 
 
Extreme Kilt | Stewart plaid cashmere flannel gown, Fall 1989 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Extreme Kilt, Fall 1989

“Everyone I admire has done a tartan collection: Perry Ellis, Ralph Lauren, Vivienne Westwood. I tried to do this without taking it too seriously.” Isaac’s visual pun converts the Scottish kilt into a strapless floor-length gown, with buckles repeated up to the bustline.

The Real Thing | Coca-Cola-can paillette dress, Spring 1994 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

The Real Thing, Spring 1994

 
 
The Real Thing | Coca-Cola-can paillette dress, Spring 1994 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

The Real Thing, Spring 1994

The Coke can makes an improbable appearance on the runway: Mizrahi used an elaborate process to create these custom paillettes from real Coca-Cola cans. He worked with the charity We Can, which employed homeless New Yorkers to collect cans to recycle; these were shipped to the sequin-maker Langlois-Martin in Paris, where they were cut into paillettes that were then sent to India to be sewn onto dresses. The result is a high-fashion, nearly weightless modern take on a ubiquitous American icon

Sketch for Orange-Orange Coat and Jumpsuit, Fall 1988 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Sketch for Orange-Orange Coat and Jumpsuit, Fall 1988

Isaac Mizrahi Quote
Orange-Orange Coat and Jumpsuit, Fall 1988 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Orange-Orange Coat and Jumpsuit, Fall 1988

Wool-melton coat with wool jersey striped jumpsuit, wool crepe scarf from Isaac’s breakout collection, Fall 1988.

 
 
Undone, Spring 1998 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Undone, Spring 1998

Undone, Spring 1998 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Undone, Spring 1998

This dress reveals its exoskeleton with exposed ribbing in the bodice, horsehair interfacing at the bustline and grosgrain at the waist. The “dead rose”-color satin was inspired by a gown worn by Deborah Kerr in the musical film The King and I. Isaac sent the movie to the textile house in Italy to have the color perfectly matched.

Sketch for Velvet Strapless Gown with Satin Knot, Fall 1988 | Photo by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Sketch for Velvet Strapless Gown with Satin Knot, Fall 1988

Isaac Mizrahi Quote
 
 
Photo by Gregg Richards

Photo by Gregg Richards

I.M.: A Memoir by Isaac Mizrahi on sale February 26, 2019
www.helloisaac.com

 

All photos by Jason Frank Rothenberg

Special Thanks to Isaac Mizrahi & Shanleigh Ciena